Depending on which news sources you follow, Milwaukee is going through either a “renaissance” or a “reinvention.” Or maybe it’s a “reboot” or a “reimagining,” like that crappy Tim Burton version of Planet Of The Apes. However you want to define it, it’s safe to say that Milwaukee is currently building a lot of new and wonderful things.

• Three Leaf Development LLC—a.k.a. the development firm owned by Milwaukee Bucks player Pat Connaughton—is going ahead with plans to build a six-story, 50-unit apartment building at 1737-1751 N. Palmer St. in the city’s Brewers Hill neighborhood. Which involves razing a two-story building on the site. Yes, longtime “New And Wonderful Things” readers will remember this project as the one that, as the [Milwaukee Journal Sentinel] puts it, “forced around a half-dozen small businesses and residents in two apartments to relocate.” And it’s not the only big development for Pat: Three Leaf has already built a three-unit building at 1245-1247 N. Milwaukee St., started construction on another building at 1697 N. Marshall St., and wants to build a four-story, 42-unit apartment building in Shorewood.

• They’re gonna demolish that pedestrian bridge over N. Vel R. Phillips Avenue that connects the Hyatt Regency and the Wisconsin Center. The demolition—scheduled for late September—is part of the big Wisconsin Center expansion/overhaul. Prep work for that expansion/overhaul is already underway. [Milwaukee Business Journal]

• The Milwaukee School of Engineering is building a new pocket park and welcome center for its downtown campus. The 1.13-acre park “will include 62 trees, a hammock grove, wi-fi and a fully accessible path,” [Urban Milwaukee] explains. “A wall for projecting movies or games is included in the plans, as is a monument sign.” Both projects are expected to be completed by the end of the year.

• Two buildings in the Tannery complex in Walker’s Point—the Timbers and Atlas buildings, to be exact—are being renovated “in an effort to lure new tenants.” [Urban Milwaukee]

• Milwaukee County Parks has won a $453,954 grant from the National Park Service to improve the Oak Leaf Trail. “The grant will help fund the construction of a new separated, off-road path for the Oak Leaf Trail’s Kinnickinnic Line, approximately one mile, from 16th St to 27th street,” [CBS 58] explains. “As well as the trail construction, the project will include tree plantings, rain gardens and renovation of outdoor recreation facilities.” Construction could begin in 2023.

• A chunk of the old Milwaukee Journal Sentinel complex in downtown Milwaukee is now affordable housing for Milwaukee Area Technical College students! Developer Joshua Jeffers should be commended for this incredible project. [Milwaukee Business Journal]

• A chunk of the old Milwaukee Journal Sentinel complex in downtown Milwaukee is now affordable housing for Milwaukee Area Technical College students! Developer Joshua Jeffers should be commended for this incredible project. [BizTimes]

• A chunk of the old Milwaukee Journal Sentinel complex in downtown Milwaukee is now affordable housing for Milwaukee Area Technical College students! Developer Joshua Jeffers should be commended for this incredible project. [TMJ 4]

• A chunk of the old Milwaukee Journal Sentinel complex in downtown Milwaukee is now affordable housing for Milwaukee Area Technical College students! Developer Joshua Jeffers should be commended for this incredible project. [Urban Milwaukee]

• A chunk of the old Milwaukee Journal Sentinel complex in downtown Milwaukee is now affordable housing for Milwaukee Area Technical College students! Developer Joshua Jeffers should be commended for this incredible project. [Milwaukee Journal Sentinel]

• And what did we learn this week? Well, they’re always building something. Isn’t that right, old song from my old band that’s reuniting December 19 at Cactus Club?

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About The Author

Co-Founder and Editor

Matt Wild weighs between 140 and 145 pounds. He lives on Milwaukee's east side.

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