City Life – Milwaukee Record http://milwaukeerecord.com Music, culture, gentle sarcasm. Mon, 13 Aug 2018 19:12:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.8 http://milwaukeerecord.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/cropped-mrapp-32x32.jpg City Life – Milwaukee Record http://milwaukeerecord.com 32 32 Mandatory Milwaukee: Nature and community meet at the Urban Ecology Center http://milwaukeerecord.com/city-life/mandatory-milwaukee-nature-community-urban-ecology-center/ http://milwaukeerecord.com/city-life/mandatory-milwaukee-nature-community-urban-ecology-center/#respond Mon, 13 Aug 2018 19:02:16 +0000 http://milwaukeerecord.com/?p=54331 Some places come and go, while some places become icons. Mandatory Milwaukee is all about the latter. Join us as we revisit beloved and well-worn local staples with fresh eyes, and explore how they might figure in the city’s future. here are plenty of places in the city where one can, well, get away from the city. Lake […]

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Some places come and go, while some places become icons. Mandatory Milwaukee is all about the latter. Join us as we revisit beloved and well-worn local staples with fresh eyes, and explore how they might figure in the city’s future.

There are plenty of places in the city where one can, well, get away from the city. Lake Michigan. Lake Park. Any park. Hell, even Downer Woods is kind of nice. But few nature-minded Milwaukee destinations are more ingrained in the fabric of the city than the Urban Ecology Center. For nearly three decades, the UEC has served as an environmental educational facility and an urban respite, a nature center and a community center. If years have passed since your last visit to the beloved local organization, there’s no better time for a reacquaintance. The Urban Ecology Center is as “mandatory” as they come.

The story of the Urban Ecology Center is a story of community action at its finest. In the early 1990s, residents were concerned about the state of their beloved 15-acre, Frederick Law Olmsted-designed Riverside Park. (Olmsted also designed Lake and Washington parks in Milwaukee, and Central Park in New York City.) Located on the city’s East Side next to Riverside University High School, the park had become overrun with crime, trash, and, worst of all, invasive plant species.

“Before the kids arrived, we would have to do a ‘park scan’: pick up condoms and needles, scoop up the dog poop, put out the fires and bring a can of paint to cover up the graffiti,” UEC Executive Director Ken Leinbach told Milwaukee Magazine in 2016. “It still looked and felt like a park—with beautiful old oak trees and indigo buntings flitting around—but it was an urban wasteland.”

Neighborhood cleanups under the banner of “Friends of Riverside Park” soon led to something more ambitious: the creation of an educational center that would give back to the community and ultimately save the park.

The UEC’s first physical incarnation was hardly grandiose, however. A double-wide trailer (sans running water) served as both classroom and office. That the trailer was perched on a county park and land owned by Milwaukee Public Schools further complicated matters. (The UEC eventually ironed out a preservation lease with the county for $1 per year.)

It wasn’t until 2004 that the UEC left the trailer behind and set up shop in its current home: a $5 million, 20,000-square-foot, award-winning “green facility” at 1500 E. Park Place. Walking into that complex today is like walking into the coolest “up north” cabin imaginable. A large fireplace dominates the main room (the chimney bricks were salvaged from a 100-year-old Chicago warehouse). An animal room stocked with turtles, frogs, salamanders, and more beckons curious children (say hello to Paul the snapping turtle!). A partially hidden kiddie slide beckons adventurous children (there’s a secret outdoor entrance, too). Classrooms, art exhibits, musical instruments, board games, maps, and wood, wood, wood abound. And it wouldn’t be an environmentally conscious facility without a rainwater flush toilet!

There’s more outside. A 75-foot observation tower, complete with a 40-foot climbing wall, offers a gorgeous view of the East Side and beyond (not to mention the 256 photovoltaic panels covering the UEC’s roof). A wraparound deck boasts reclaimed wood from leftover scraps of the Atlantic City Boardwalk. A “people-powered” pond, meanwhile, features some good old fashioned au naturel nature.

Then there’s the nearby Milwaukee Rotary Centennial Arboretum. Opened in 2013, the Arboretum is 40 acres of urban greenspace stocked with 12 (!) different Wisconsin habitats, 70 (!) species of trees, hundreds of birds and mammals, and thousands of native plants and wildflowers. The majority of the Arboretum is located between the Milwaukee River and the Oak Leaf Trail, stretching from the North Avenue bridge all the way to the Locust Street Bridge. (The Arboretum is also part of the encompassing 878-acre Milwaukee River Greenway.)

Inside the woods, you’ll find two miles of trails peppered with carefully planned (yet fully natural) “ImagiNature” stations, perfect for kids and adults who can’t help but climb over and under giant logs and downed trees. It’s an absolutely gorgeous, entirely unlikely place in the middle of Milwaukee, and one of only 22 designated “Children’s Forests” in the country. If you’ve never poked around this part of the Urban Ecology Center, get poking.

There are currently three Urban Ecology Centers in Milwaukee—Riverside Park, Washington Park, Menomonee Valley—but their missions are the same:

• Provide outdoor science education for urban youth

• Protect and use public natural areas, making them safe, accessible and vibrant

• Preserve and enhance these natural areas and their surrounding waters

• Promote community by offering resources that support learning, volunteerism, stewardship, recreation and camaraderie

• Practice and model environmentally responsible behaviors

To that end, the UEC schedules a bevy of school and community programs, summer camps, “urban adventures,” hiking and paddling events, and oodles more. Its calendar is kind of loaded. Its Washington Park site is expanding.

“The UEC taught me a sense of community,” writes employee Jaime Cano in a recent blog. “It showed me how truly important it is to care for your community and come together with neighbors to bring the best out of any environment. It showed me the power of revitalization and positive action and energy. I see the difference we make in the community and in the lives of the families we serve. I feel a sense of belonging with the UEC and for the first time, inspiration to invest in and care for my community, wherever that may be.”

And there’s that (oft-abused) word again: community. The Urban Ecology Center may feel like an escape from the city, but its history, its mission, and its success are all inseparable from the city. It offers a communion with nature, sure, but it also offers a communion with the place we call home: Milwaukee.

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40 things to do in Milwaukee during the 40 remaining days of summer http://milwaukeerecord.com/city-life/40-things-to-do-in-milwaukee-during-the-40-remaining-days-of-summer/ http://milwaukeerecord.com/city-life/40-things-to-do-in-milwaukee-during-the-40-remaining-days-of-summer/#respond Mon, 13 Aug 2018 15:22:05 +0000 http://milwaukeerecord.com/?p=54328 Though you’ve likely spent much of the summer to this point screaming at strangers while navigating through road construction, it’s still comforting to know that of the 90-plus days in the season, 40 still remain. But what to do with those 40 days? In the interest of making sure the rest of your summer is […]

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Though you’ve likely spent much of the summer to this point screaming at strangers while navigating through road construction, it’s still comforting to know that of the 90-plus days in the season, 40 still remain. But what to do with those 40 days? In the interest of making sure the rest of your summer is bursting with live music, block parties, rib-tickling comedy, more live music, and the 10th anniversary of Mondo Lucha, we’ve assembled this handy, mega-sized Tracklist. Plan accordingly, Milwaukee, and enjoy it while it lasts.

Monday, August 13
Musical Mondays with My Sweet Patootie @ Lake Park

Tuesday, August 14
Chill On The Hill with Xposed 4Heads, The Quilz, and Kinsella Irish School Of Irish Dance @ Humboldt Park

Wednesday, August 15
Milwaukee Record presents Half Baked @ Avalon Theater
Subversive 1998 stoner comedy, Half Baked, stars Dave Chappelle as Thurgood Jenkins, a custodian who—with the help of friends Scarface (Guillermo Diaz) and Brian (Jim Breuer)—takes desperate measures to raise enough money to bail out his imprisoned pal Kenny (Harland Williams). Along the way, the friends face some unexpected obstacles, Jenkins meets a woman named Mary Jane, and lots and lots of weed is smoked. Between its endless well of hilarious quotes and some memorable cameos from Steven Wright, Bob Saget, Snoop Dogg, Jon Stewart, Willie Nelson, and Tommy Chong, Half Baked is still as enjoyable as it was 20 years ago. Tickets to this 7 p.m. screening are $5. We’re also offering a $10 “Going Green” package that includes a movie ticket, a pint of Lakefront’s Organika organic white ale, and an Abba-Zabba candy bar.

Thursday, August 16
The Shacks + Amanda Huff @ The Back Room at Colectivo

Friday, August 17
Weezer + White Reaper @ The Rave
Is it okay to like Weezer again? Yeah, Rivers Cuomo and company were in the weeds for a while (everything from Make Believe to Hurley, let’s say), but their last few albums (Everything Will Be Alright In The End, “The White Album,” Pacific Daydreams) have been pretty good! Then there’s that 1994 debut album (the so-called “Blue Album”) and its mythic follow-up, Pinkerton. C’mon, those are undisputed classics! “Buddy Holly”! “Say It Ain’t So”! All the semi-creepy Pinkerton songs Cuomo wrote at Harvard! What’s not to love? Still not enough? White Reaper is opening!

Saturday, August 18
Fat Joe + Yung Joc, and Ying Yang Twins @ Miller High Life Theatre

Sunday, August 19
Milwaukee Irish Fest @ Henry Maier Festival Park

Monday, August 20
Reverend Beat-Man & Nicole Izobel Garcia, Lil’ Bobby Bleed (BLEED), and The Ornerys @ Cactus Club

Tuesday, August 21
Chill On The Hill with Who’s Your Daddy Trio, Matchstick, and Beto y Azul @ Humboldt Park

Wednesday, August 22
Vanity Plates + Starter Jacket, Something Like Monument, and Flat Teeth @ Cactus Club

Thursday, August 23
Cake + Ben Folds @ BMO Harris Pavilion
Cake did/does those instantly recognizable songs like “The Distance” and “Satan Is My Motor.” Ben Folds did/does those instantly recognizable songs like “Brick” and “Underground.” Good lord, has it really been 20-some years since all those songs were floating around in the turn-of-the-century alternative ether? Prolonging the magic, indeed. Anyway, this co-headlining show should be fun. Maybe Shatner will show up.

Friday, August 24
The Chick Corea Akoustic Band + John Patitucci and Dave Weckl @ Pabst Theater

Saturday, August 25
WMSE’s 9th annual Backyard BBQ @ Humboldt Park
On Saturday, August 25, from noon until 8 p.m. at Humboldt Park, beloved independent radio station WMSE will once again say thank you to its fans and supporters with its 9th annual end-of-summer shindig. And this year has a hell of a musical headliner: Old 97’s. The legendary band will be joined by an impressive cast of locals, including Buffalo Gospel, The Vitrolum Republic, Bailey Dee, and Altered Five Blues Band.

Sunday, August 26
Triple Eye Industries Fest (Day 3) @ Franks Power Plant
Today, in the era of Name-Your-Price digital downloads, 99 cent iTunes singles, and abject saturation in the music industry, owning a record label isn’t exactly the glamorous and financially lucrative endeavor it once was. Though the profit margins are slim (if they exist at all), countless entrepreneurs continue to funnel their passion for music into record labels, including more than a few operations based right here in Milwaukee.

One of the youngest and smallest of those local imprints is Triple Eye Industries. What the label lacks in longevity and finances, it more than makes up for in ambition. Over the course of roughly four years in business, they’ve managed an astounding 35 releases—many of them in vinyl format. From Friday, August 24 through Sunday, August 26, Triple Eye Industries will celebrate its fourth anniversary with a three-day, three-venue, four-show festival that will feature more than 15 bands from throughout the Midwest and beyond.

Monday, August 27
David Dondero @ Cactus Club

Tuesday, August 28
Chill On The Hill with Zach Pietrini, Mike Mangione & The Kin, and Trapper Schoepp @ Humboldt Park

Wednesday, August 29
L.A. Witch + Moonwalks, and Whips @ Cactus Club
The last time L.A. Witch came to Cactus Club, the dark and dour rock trio was an up-and-coming band that was just starting to turn some heads. This time around, they’re an established band that’s here to stay. The (you guessed it) Los Angeles outfit returns to the site of their first Milwaukee show as part of a tour in belated support for last year’s self-titled debut. Moonwalks will play before them and Whips will ensure this mid-week show is great from top to bottom with some local flavor in the opening slot.

Thursday, August 30
Harley-Davidson 115th Anniversary @ various venues
H-D’s 115th birthday is a citywide affair. From concerts to parties to rides, there’s a ton to do.

Friday, August 31
Friday Nite Music with For The Culture @ Colectivo’s Lakefront Cafe

Saturday, September 1
Nickel&Rose (EP release) + King Courteen, and Grasping At Straws @ Company Brewing

Sunday, September 2
Big Gig BBQ @ Henry Maier Festival Park
Bands. Barbecue. Bacon-eating contest.

Monday, September 3
Milwaukee Brewers vs. Chicago Cubs @ Miller Park
Take Monday off and enjoy a 1:10 game. Bring the kids.

Tuesday, September 4
The Killers + Violent Femmes @ Fiserv Forum
The duty of kicking off the first of hopefully many shows at the new downtown arena goes to The Killers and (kind of?) Milwaukee’s own Violent Femmes.

Wednesday, September 5
Neko Case + Thao Nguyen @ Pabst Theater
Oh, hell. Is there anyone better than Neko Case—solo or with The New Pornographers? No.

Thursday, September 6
Sales + Hana Vu @ The Back Room at Colectivo

Friday, September 7
Mondo Lucha @ Turner Hall
Since 2008, Milwaukee’s Mondo Lucha has whipped the city’s wrestling nerds (and closet wrestling nerds) into the turnbuckles with over-the-top, high-flying, masked lucha libre wrestling extravaganzas. The homegrown company has consistently put on high-production, multi-media shows that dwarf anything else on the indie wrestling circuit, and has done it all with its tongue ever-so-slightly in cheek. If you’re the kind of person who pines for the days when ridiculous storylines ruled the day and the WWE was still the WWF, look no further for your masked, retro wrestling kick to the face.

On September 7, Mondo Lucha will return to Turner Hall for its milestone “10th Anniversary Spectacular,” which will include everything fans have come to know and love: top-shelf athleticism, burlesque dancers, and live music. Like every year, you won’t want to miss it. Something tells us the 10th anniversary is going to be extra special.

Saturday, September 8
Ringo Starr & His All Starr Band @ BMO Harris Pavilion
Let’s just come out and say it: Ringo Starr is great. He’s a living legend, a comforting presence in a world gone mad, and a genius drummer (arguments over that last point in the comments below, please). So who’s in Ringo’s ever-changing All Starr Band this time around? How about Colin Hay (“Who Can It Be Now”), Steve Lukather (“Africa”), Gregg Rolie (“Black Magic Woman”), and more. So yeah: THE DUDE FROM TOTO WILL TOTALLY PLAY “AFRICA.” Also, Ringo will play “Matchbox” and “With A Little Help From My Friends,” obviously.

Sunday, September 9
Hasan Minhaj @ Pabst Theater

Monday, September 10
Nothing.
Go to a museum or something.

Tuesday, September 11
Mastodon + Dinosaur Jr., and Netherlands @ The Rave
Damn.

Wednesday, September 12
Milwaukee Record presents (movie title TBA) @ Avalon Theater
It’s going to be good!

Thursday, September 13
Kevin Hart @ Fiserv Forum
A few years removed from his six-show Pabst Theater run, actor/comedian Kevin Hart will help break in the newly-named Fiserv Forum with what’s sure to be a hilarious performance.

Friday, September 14
Casey James Prestwood & The Burning Angels, DUSK, Best Westerns, DJ Scary Barry @ Cactus Club

Saturday, September 15
Bay View Bash @ Kinnickinnic Avenue
Now that some of Milwaukee’s first major festivals of the season are in the rear view mirror, we’re ready to look ahead to one of the city’s biggest late-summer undertakings. Bay View Bash will return to Kinnickinnic Avenue on Saturday, September 15. Though it’s still more than two months away, you’ll want to make sure you’re around to take in the sights and sounds of the behemoth block party. The full lineup hasn’t been announced, but Rush-Mor has lined up an outstanding lineup as usual, and the inaugural year of the Milwaukee Record Stage will feature Mike Krol and many more. See you there.

Sunday, September 16
RuPaul’s Drag Race @ Pabst Theater

Monday, September 17
Charly Bliss @ The Back Room at Colectivo

Tuesday, September 18
Alejandro Escovedo + Don Antonio @ The Back Room at Colectivo

Wednesday, September 19
Jeff Tweedy + James Elkington @ Pabst Theater
Wilco member Jeff Tweedy at Pabst Theater? Yes please.

Thursday, September 20
Father John Misty + King Tuff @ Pabst Theater

Friday, September 21
Justin Timberlake @ Fiserv Forum

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Okay, it looks like Milwaukee is doing “game show battle rooms” now http://milwaukeerecord.com/city-life/okay-looks-like-milwaukee-game-show-battle-rooms/ http://milwaukeerecord.com/city-life/okay-looks-like-milwaukee-game-show-battle-rooms/#respond Fri, 10 Aug 2018 05:25:12 +0000 http://milwaukeerecord.com/?p=54285 Every Friday, Off The Record looks to other Milwaukee publications (and beyond) for bits of news we missed throughout the week. • First came the ramen. Then came the poke. Then came the axe-throwing bars and the video game bars and the cat-petting cafes. (Also: “foot bowling bars”?) And now, dear Milwaukee contestants, comes the latest […]

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Every Friday, Off The Record looks to other Milwaukee publications (and beyond) for bits of news we missed throughout the week.

• First came the ramen. Then came the poke. Then came the axe-throwing bars and the video game bars and the cat-petting cafes. (Also: “foot bowling bars”?) And now, dear Milwaukee contestants, comes the latest thing that Minneapolis was doing a year ago: “game show battle rooms.”

Well, make that Game Show Battle Rooms, because that’s the name of a new business headed to Brookfield this fall. Minnesota-based college buddies (and former pedal tavern owners, natch) David Sauer and Kevin Letnes opened their first Game Show Battle Room in suburban Minneapolis last year, and now plan to open a second in a 2,800-square-foot space at 12565 W. Feerick St., a block south of Capitol Drive. “There’s just a lot of momentum behind experience-based activities,” Sauer told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. “We thought, why not bring a full, immersive game-show experience to the public?”

So what, exactly, is included in a full, immersive game-show experience? For $29.95, customers get to compete in games like “Wheel of Phrases,” “Friendly Feud,” and “Name That Price”—all hosted by “theatrically minded people” (enter the ghost of Chuck Barris). Sessions last about 90 minutes. The whole thing is all-ages, and there’s no alcohol allowed (exit the ghost of Chuck Barris). Sauer and Letnes hope to open in early October.

“We’ve had 8-year-olds all the way up to 95-year-olds,” Sauer added. “We’ve had senior citizens’ homes come through. They’ve had a blast.” No word yet on whether a tired and exasperated Steve Harvey will materialize anytime someone yells out “FART!” “FLATULATING!” or “PASSING GAS!” [Milwaukee Journal Sentinel]

• Speaking of this kind of stuff, there’s a new escape room coming to Brady Street in September. [Urban Milwaukee]

• Atomic Glass—which hasn’t been a thing for a while—has been found liable for selling 60,006 packets of synthetic cannabinoid products, and now has to pony up a cool $4.5 million. [Milwaukee Journal Sentinel]

• Stand. Eat. Drink. Hospitality Group is bringing a new concept, Don’s Diner, to the former c.1880 in Walker’s Point. [BizTimes]

• Mark Borchardt directed a video for Tenement and it’s great. [The A.V. Club]

• So long, N. 4th Street (from W. St. Paul Avenue to W. Capitol Drive); hello, N. Vel R. Phillips Avenue [Urban Milwaukee]

• The first event to set up shop outside the new Bucks arena Fiserv Forum will be…Milwaukee Oktoberfest, coming October 5-7. [BizTimes]

• The Tied House, located at 124 N. Water St., has hired a new chef and plans to do a Saturday and Sunday brunch, plus a “gourmet twist on Friday fish fry.” [Milwaukee Business Journal]

• Marcus Theaters will not screen that new Slender Man movie in the Milwaukee area. [Fox6]

• The “Phone Keeps Ringing” for Vincent Van Great and Dana Coppafeel. [Soundcloud]

• Popsicle maker Pete’s Pops will host a grand opening for its new storefront at 3809 W. Vliet St. on August 18. [BizTimes]

• The Riverwest Cafe Corazon will close for a few weeks, beginning September 3, for some “major building maintenance and renovation.” [OnMilwaukee]

• Charlie “Manitowoc Minute” Berens is returning to the Pabst Theater November 3. [OnMilwaukee]

• A new Bay View pie place, SmallPie, is open. [Urban Milwaukee]

• MKE Brewing Co.’s new 9th Street brewery is opening soon. [OnMilwaukee]

• Have a great weekend, Milwaukee!

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MKE SEX: What IS sex, anyway? http://milwaukeerecord.com/city-life/mke-sex-what-is-sex-anyway/ http://milwaukeerecord.com/city-life/mke-sex-what-is-sex-anyway/#respond Fri, 10 Aug 2018 05:05:17 +0000 http://milwaukeerecord.com/?p=54273 bout two weeks ago, Brock Turner appeared in the headlines again. You remember Brock Turner? He’s the college guy who sexually assaulted an unconscious woman behind a dumpster. He was convicted, only sentenced to six months in prison, and then released after three months. But then he came back, trying to overturn his conviction with […]

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About two weeks ago, Brock Turner appeared in the headlines again. You remember Brock Turner? He’s the college guy who sexually assaulted an unconscious woman behind a dumpster. He was convicted, only sentenced to six months in prison, and then released after three months. But then he came back, trying to overturn his conviction with a claim that he couldn’t be guilty of sexual assault because he wasn’t trying to have sex with the woman. He was only seeking “outercourse,” which doesn’t involve penetration.* If there’s not penetration, it’s not really sex, is it?

But, like, what is sex?

This one is easy, right? It’s the thing we’re all supposed to be looking for, the thing that sells cars and booze and super-sized burger meals. It’s the reproductive act. In other words, sex is putting a penis in a vagina and thrusting until the penis ejaculates. That’s what most of us are taught in school or by our parents. The little bit of sex ed that kids get in our culture is almost all focused on anatomy of the reproductive organs, and how to avoid getting a sexually transmitted infection. But defining sex as an act that involves both a penis and a vagina utterly erases the experiences of gay men, lesbians, and other queers whose genitals match those of their partners. The reality is that for most people, sex is so much more than penis-in-vagina sex.

I posed the question on my own Facebook page, and these are some of the answers I got. (My comments follow in parentheses.)

• Becoming one. (That’s a lovely sentiment. Can you separate yourselves out again though?)

• Intimate contact involving genitals with the intent to arouse. (I once knew a woman who had intense orgasms when her partner would lick a tattoo at the nape of her neck. Was that sex?)

• An act between two or more people with intent to initiate and complete the sexual response cycle. (This is good! It’s not limited by sex, gender, or monogamy. What about masturbation though? In addition to being the safest form of stimulation, having sex all by yourself is pleasurable and satisfying. )

• It shows me how special I am to this person, and how special I want him to feel. (Sex as an act of love can be amazing. And for some folks, hook-ups and casual dating are also amazing.)

See, figuring out what sex is can be pretty difficult. This response is my favorite:

• I’m gonna start with I have no idea. It seems like many people think something has to go in something else for it to “count.” Or that at least one genital has to be involved. Does a sex act mean you’ve had sex or is it like a smaller unit that doesn’t quite add up to sex? If you have enough sex acts, does that mean you’ve had sex?

Even the state of Wisconsin acknowledges a wide variety of experiences can be called sex. Wisconsin defines “sexual contact” as intentional touching of someone’s “intimate parts” with any body part or object (clothed or unclothed), or intentional penile ejaculation, urination, or defecation anywhere on someone’s body (clothed or unclothed). Sexual intercourse is defined as cunnilingus, fellatio, genital or anal penetration (however slight), with or without ejaculation.

Personally, I have two definitions for sex. Solo sex is touching your body in any way that brings you sexual pleasure, with or without orgasm. And partnered sex is all the different ways that two or more people can share their bodies with the mutual and consensual goal of sexual pleasure, with or without orgasm. Obviously, this leaves room for all sorts of wonderful things like masturbation, oral sex, anal sex, grinding, using sex toys, hand jobs, finger fucking, and almost anything else you enjoy. Your own personal definition of sex may vary. But no matter what, you need to communicate that definition to your partner(s).

We are living in a period of time when we’re expanding our awareness about the absolute necessity of consent, as well as our understanding of queer orientations and identities. It is imperative that we have a broad definition of sex. That definition must include all types of people and all kinds of physical contact, as well an affirmation that not only does “no” mean no, but only “yes” means yes.

*Brock Turner was convicted of sexual assault because he penetrated his victim with his finger. His claim of seeking “outercourse” was shot down by the California court of appeals, which unanimously agreed that Turner received a fair trial the first time and would not receive a new trial.

Curious about cunnilingus? Anxious about anal? Do you have questions about queefs or problems with your prostate? Lucky Tomaszek is the education coordinator at The Tool Shed: An Erotic Boutique, Milwaukee’s only mission-driven, education-focused sex toy store. Send her an email at mkesex@gmail.com and she’ll get back to you with an answer.

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A five-foot-long iguana is on the loose on the East Side, and it gets goofier from there http://milwaukeerecord.com/city-life/five-foot-long-iguana-on-the-loose-east-side/ http://milwaukeerecord.com/city-life/five-foot-long-iguana-on-the-loose-east-side/#respond Thu, 09 Aug 2018 05:50:58 +0000 http://milwaukeerecord.com/?p=54170 ast week, in a momentary break from a world gone ugly and insane, CBS 58 reported on a five-foot-long iguana on the loose in Milwaukee’s Murray Hill neighborhood. It seems that a month and a half ago, a pet iguana named Nail escaped from his home at East Side comic book shop The Turning Page—by […]

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Last week, in a momentary break from a world gone ugly and insane, CBS 58 reported on a five-foot-long iguana on the loose in Milwaukee’s Murray Hill neighborhood. It seems that a month and a half ago, a pet iguana named Nail escaped from his home at East Side comic book shop The Turning Page—by breaking and jumping through a second-story window. A picture eventually surfaced showing what appeared to be Nail crawling around on a roof near Greenwich and Murray avenues. Nail’s owner, Zach Hauser, told CBS 58 that animal control was unable to help him capture the elusive beast, and that he was seeking the assistance of local trappers. Y’all know me. Know how I earn a livin’. I’ll catch this iguana for you, but it ain’t gonna be easy. Bad lizard! Not like going down to the park and chasing East Side turkeys.

Anyway, there have been plenty of twists and turns in the saga of Nail, The Pet Iguana Who Jumped From The Second-Story Window Of A Milwaukee Comic Book Shop And Will Hopefully Live To Tell The Tale Because, Yikes, This Thing’s Apparently Originally From California And It’s Gonna Get Cold Soon. Over on the always entertaining/exasperating social network Nextdoor, Murray Hill neighbors have been discussing Nail’s whereabouts, pondering whether or not iguanas pose a danger to toddlers and cats, talking about trap sizes, wondering if Hauser “dumped” the lizard, dragging the police into it (oh, East Side), and yelling at each other about gun control (oh, internet). It’s like those frequently awful Riverwest and Bay View Facebook pages, but with more reptiles and fewer Prius Ladies.

Here are some highlights from the time the story broke to today. Good luck, Nail and Zach (and thanks to reader Natalie for the Nextdoor tip)!

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Heartwarming MCTS video of the week: Watch a bus driver stop at a kids lemonade stand http://milwaukeerecord.com/city-life/heartwarming-mcts-bus-driver-kids-lemonade-stand/ http://milwaukeerecord.com/city-life/heartwarming-mcts-bus-driver-kids-lemonade-stand/#respond Thu, 09 Aug 2018 05:30:38 +0000 http://milwaukeerecord.com/?p=54258 Our un-ironic love for the Milwaukee County Transit System knows no bounds. We’ve sung the bus’ praises on these pages and on the radio. The bus has sung our praises for doing so. We were filmed on the bus for last year’s Milwaukee Film Festival trailers. We ride the damn thing practically every day. Plus, the Ride […]

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Our un-ironic love for the Milwaukee County Transit System knows no bounds. We’ve sung the bus’ praises on these pages and on the radio. The bus has sung our praises for doing so. We were filmed on the bus for last year’s Milwaukee Film Festival trailers. We ride the damn thing practically every day. Plus, the Ride MCTS app is kind of slick.

So yeah, the bus rules. Need proof? Joining the “MCTS driver befriends adorable 4-year-old girl” video from March, and the “MCTS driver helps blind passenger” video from July (not to mention dozens of others) is the latest heartwarming MCTS video: a driver, Rhonda White, stopping by a kids lemonade stand.

What makes the video so great? White stops her bus, gives the kids some money, declines a lemonade, and drives off. “Good luck, kids!” says White in the MCTS-produced video. “Please let the driver know how much better she made five small children’s day,” says the kids’ father. “There’s still plenty of good in the world and we’re all going to get through this together,” says us.

(Yes, MCTS advertises with us, but we’d still totally love it and write about it even if it didn’t.)

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Here are some important FieriCon updates http://milwaukeerecord.com/city-life/here-are-some-important-fiericon-updates/ http://milwaukeerecord.com/city-life/here-are-some-important-fiericon-updates/#respond Wed, 08 Aug 2018 05:40:23 +0000 http://milwaukeerecord.com/?p=54150 Less than a week ago, we invited you to FieriCon. Organized by Milwaukee native Andy Holcomb (who currently lives in Chicago), the event aims to honor polarizing Food Network personality Guy Fieri and transform the Walker’s Point neighborhood into Flavortown, USA for six-plus hours on August 25. Since last week’s announcement caused unexpected levels of […]

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Less than a week ago, we invited you to FieriCon. Organized by Milwaukee native Andy Holcomb (who currently lives in Chicago), the event aims to honor polarizing Food Network personality Guy Fieri and transform the Walker’s Point neighborhood into Flavortown, USA for six-plus hours on August 25.

Since last week’s announcement caused unexpected levels of excitement—surprising both Holcomb and some local bars that weren’t previously aware they were going to be part of this whimsical bar crawl—there have been some new developments. The organizer was kind enough to send a series of updates our way.

“This event was just some Guy Fieri enthusiasts that wanted to day drink and dress up as the man himself,” Holcomb says. “When you broke the story, it went from zero to hot sauce really fast.”

After the article, Holcomb says some Walker’s Point bars reached out to him to ask if they could get in on the fun. With no locations finalized and the newfound realization that the event had likely outgrown some spots, a few adjustments were made.

“I figured I would make the first eight [bars to ask] Flavor Town,” Holcomb says. “I am still working out the times a little, and I may have to break things up into groups if it gets to big.”

Presently, O’Lydia’s (originally the final destination) will start things off at 2 p.m. Since the original map came out, Great Lakes Distillery has been added to the mix, as well as current final stop, Drink Wisconsinbly. The updated schedule and list of participating bars can be found on this map Lone Shoe Graphics made for the occasion.

Another newcomer to the flavorful festivities is Nomad Nacional, which will be hosting a Childhood Cancer Fundraiser in its spacious south parking lot from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. that night. The FieriCon stop at Nacional is scheduled for 5 p.m. to coincide with the fundraiser and hopefully add a beneficial aspect to the cosplay affair.

“A bunch of Fieris will be attending, and Fieri hates cancer more than bad buffalo wings,” Holcomb says.

Now well aware of the interest Milwaukee has in FieriCon, Holcomb also made it easier to keep up on what’s happening leading up to the event and potential changes day-of changes on August 25. He’s made an official Facebook event. He also had his friend Spencer Charczuk make an interactive map for use on mobile devices.

While the noble bar crawl idea has already grown far beyond his expectations, the spirit of the idea is still simple: dress like Guy Fieri, embrace all things Flavortown, and tip your bartenders.

“I am very excited,” Holcomb says. “I get to day-drink with a ton of people dressed as Guy Fieri and ask what Flavortown means to them.”

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It’s apparently International Cat Day, so here’s everything we’ve published about cats http://milwaukeerecord.com/city-life/its-apparently-international-cat-day-so-heres-everything-weve-published-about-cats/ http://milwaukeerecord.com/city-life/its-apparently-international-cat-day-so-heres-everything-weve-published-about-cats/#respond Wed, 08 Aug 2018 05:05:34 +0000 http://milwaukeerecord.com/?p=54165 Today is August 8, 2018. Coincidentally, today is also apparently International Cat Day. Please don’t fault us for nearly forgetting this momentous annual occasion that’s reserved for celebrating, honoring, and revering our furry friends. The summer has simply gotten away from us. While, unfortunately, we don’t have any new cat-crafted content to share with you […]

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Today is August 8, 2018. Coincidentally, today is also apparently International Cat Day. Please don’t fault us for nearly forgetting this momentous annual occasion that’s reserved for celebrating, honoring, and revering our furry friends. The summer has simply gotten away from us.

While, unfortunately, we don’t have any new cat-crafted content to share with you on this special holiday, our archives just so happen to be stocked with a respectable amount of articles devoted to felines. If you want a brief moment of pause (or “paws”) from the drudgery of world news, consider reading, looking at, or listening to everything we’ve ever published about cats in our near-five-year history.

The catnap coziness of all the cats at the new Sip & Purr cat cafe, ranked
“While all were thoroughly enjoyable and would make for wonderful companions (adopt them!), some were truer masters of the catnap. Here are our rankings of who was able to achieve the most maximum levels of blissed-out comfort during our visit.”

A comprehensive guide to finding cats at Milwaukee Art Museum
“The gorgeous and sprawling Milwaukee Art Museum hosts a world class art collection that ranges from paintings to sculpture to photographs to mixed-media assemblages, and everything in between. If having this amenity right at your finger tips isn’t enough to get you away from your computer or phone for a few hours, perhaps the fact that MAM is home to a healthy number of pieces that feature cats—kittens and house cats, as well as lions, tigers, lynxes, even a puma—will do the trick.”

UW-Oshkosh professor and Big Lebowski superfan Paul Niesen talks Lebowski Fest, “The Dude,” cats
“Well, I’m going to see if I can get my cat into the basement, because he’s driving me nuts.”

“Cat Videos Live!” is coming to Turner Hall, is something we all need right now
“So, to paraphrase Dionne Warwick, what the world needs now are cat videos. Lots of cat videos. Preferably in a live, communal setting, so we can all huddle around the prehistoric campfire one last time before the whole thing goes to pot. After all, you can’t hear the death throes of civilization when Mr. Puddles is tumbling off his little carpet tower and into a dish of decorative potpourri.”

On The Record Episode 98: Milwaukee pets with MADACC
“Every year, Milwaukee Area Domestic Animal Control Commission (a.k.a. MADACC) rescues approximately 11,000 stray, mistreated, and abused animals. As part of the organization’s “regulation and care services,” MADACC strives to help give animals a second chance through adoption. MADACC recently started its “Pit Bull Prrroud” promotion, in which pit bulls can go to good homes for only $45, and adult cats can be adopted free of charge.”

13 standout moments from the 2016 Milwaukee Film Festival
“A gorgeously shot documentary about thousands upon thousands of stray cats roaming through the streets (and sewers) of Istanbul? Sign us up. A gorgeously shot documentary that ends up being just as much about the people who love and look after the cats as the cats themselves? Like we said, sign us up. Kedi was not only terrific on every level, but, during a standing-room-only screening at the Downer, it elicited the most ‘awww!’s and ‘ohhh’s we’ve ever heard at a movie. Four paws up!”

Dispatches from the Feline Groovy Cat Show
“There, the posh lakeside confines of Racine Civic Centre’s Memorial Hall played host to fierce competition, unmatched cuteness, a loose ’60s theme, and about 200 cats, all of which came together to take the form of the Feline Groovy Cat Show.”

I went to Wisconsin’s first “cat cafe” and it was pretty weird
“Still, with visions of a purrfect Saturday propelling me westward on I-94, I made the semi-inconvenient hour-and-a-half journey to take in the sights, sounds, and the overriding uncomfortable oddity of Wisconsin’s first cat cafe.”

Could a cat change the trajectory of the Milwaukee Bucks’ season?
“But perhaps the most troublesome statistic of them all, the one that could summon the most vitriol from devoted basketball fans across the state of Wisconsin, is that there are seemingly zero players on the current Milwaukee Bucks 15-man roster who own a cat.”

Extra Points: 25 bullshit things you can do during the Packers bye
“Cats are great furry companions, yet there are so many without a good home. Be a hero and adopt a cat already.”

Heavy Hand visits the motherfucking zoo in “Motherfucking Bobcat” video
“Also, it’s worth noting that no motherfucking bobcats appear in the animal-themed video for ‘Motherfucking Bobcat.'”

Tracklist: 8 bizarre Milwaukee Kickstarter campaigns
The fact that potato salad, of all things, is inspiring such irrational Internet-love is a bit surprising; the irrational Internet-love for cats, however, is a self-evident rule of the universe. Back in 2008, Milwaukee photographer Kate Funk created a calendar featuring 12 pictures of her vaguely grumpy cat, AC, dressed in various ridiculous outfits.

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Life, death, and the timeless amusements of Little Amerricka http://milwaukeerecord.com/city-life/life-death-timeless-amusements-little-amerricka/ http://milwaukeerecord.com/city-life/life-death-timeless-amusements-little-amerricka/#respond Mon, 06 Aug 2018 23:25:35 +0000 http://milwaukeerecord.com/?p=54027 Summer in Milwaukee is the best; summer in the Midwest is even better. Join Milwaukee Record and Miller High Life as we search the city and beyond for the Spirit Of Summer. he first thing you notice about Little Amerricka is its name. The double Rs. The troubling K. Surely it hasn’t always been this […]

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Summer in Milwaukee is the best; summer in the Midwest is even better. Join Milwaukee Record and Miller High Life as we search the city and beyond for the Spirit Of Summer.

The first thing you notice about Little Amerricka is its name. The double Rs. The troubling K. Surely it hasn’t always been this way; surely there’s some sort of Berenstain/Berenstein Bears thing going on here. But no, it has always been this way. The name comes from the park’s late founder, Lee Merrrick, a longtime livestock renderer and dog-food plant owner who built Little Amerricka in the small town of Marshall, Wisconsin (population 4,000-ish) in 1991. “I used to drink and chase women,” Merrick once said. “Now I’ve got this (amusement) park as a hobby. I’ve never made a nickel on it.”

The second thing you notice about Little Amerricka is its size and scope. It’s about 11 acres. It has about 25 museum-piece kiddie rides. A Ferris Wheel, a Mad Mouse roller coaster, a Scrambler and a Tilt-A-Whirl. Bumper boats, mini-golf, a giant tiger slide and a monorail. Almost all were purchased at auction over the years by Merrick and general manager Darrell Klompmaker. And of course, there’s also the 1/3 size railroad with three miles of track that wind through the park and beyond. It’s all the best definition of “mom-and-pop,” the best definition of “quaint.”

The final thing you notice about Little Amerricka is that it’s next to a cemetery. There, looming behind the airplane ride, the boat ride, and the slushie stand is the town cemetery, an incongruous backdrop of tombstones and flowers and mourners. On one side, life; on the other, death. This is Little Amerricka, though it could just as easily be Little America.

Is Little Amerricka worth the 66-mile drive from Milwaukee? If you’re on a budget, have a hankering for old-timey rides, and are in charge of a kid or kids in the 4-10 age range, absolutely. It’s remarkably cheap and parent-friendly. Both kids and adults only pay for what they ride: single ride tickets are $1.50 each; unlimited ride passes are $11.95, $13.95, $18.95, and $22.95. There’s a concession stand and plenty of random refreshments available throughout the park, but you can also bring your own food. Also, Klompmaker, who starred in the Little Amerricka commercials of the ’90s, totally just walks around the place like Walt Disney strolling through Disney World.

The rides are old, charming, and well-maintained. (And long. Seriously, $1.50 will get you a seemingly endless ride on the Ferris Wheel.) The staff, meanwhile, ranges from friendly high school kids to ancient retirees who aren’t afraid to holler at some punks who WON’T STOP DOING FLIPS IN THE BOUNCE HOUSE I TOLD YOU GUYS TO KNOCK IT OFF ALREADY! Some will fan your kids off when they come around in the sweltering Kiddie Wheel; others will be the subject of this unfortunate occurrence:

Speaking of the above story: In a Yelp-ified world where entitled customers and rude parents (especially rude parents) fire off angry missives any time their asses aren’t properly kissed, Little Amerricka would seem to be a one-star-rating disaster waiting to happen. It has none of the big-budget sheen of say, Great America, and all of the charm of a state fair midway. It’s rough-and-tumble, a little frayed around the edges. Again, it’s right next to a cemetery. (The park currently enjoys a four-star Yelp rating, though there are plenty of petty complaints.)

When we asked Milwaukee director Kurt Raether about his 2014 short film, Little America, he put it this way:

“Of course, America is no utopia, and neither is Little Amerricka. The attractions are mismatched, there are no fences, and the mechanics of the rides are laid bare for everyone to see. It’s really the scrappy attitude and spirit of the people running the place that keeps it together. So the park is a microcosm of a lot of things in my mind.”

And thank goodness it is a little scrappy. It’s real, it’s simple, it’s fun. A few chips of paint and splinters of wood? Live a little. And how else can you give a kid a terrific time for less than $20 and sit down with the park’s train conductor, Terrance Bullock (“Like Sandra Bullock!”), for an end-of-the-day ice cream?

“Neither Lee nor I ever saw the park becoming what it is. It just happened,” Klompmaker once said. “We just threw things together based on our past, what we’d enjoyed as kids, and what we’d want to enjoy with my kids and Lee’s grandkids and great-grandkids. We’d buy a ride and place it in the park.”

“Buy the ticket, take the ride,” someone else once said. With mortality looming just beyond its gates, Little Amerricka is a reminder to buy those tickets and take those rides while you still can.

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15 lesser-known museums in and around Milwaukee http://milwaukeerecord.com/city-life/15-lesser-known-museums-in-and-around-milwaukee/ http://milwaukeerecord.com/city-life/15-lesser-known-museums-in-and-around-milwaukee/#respond Mon, 06 Aug 2018 16:02:21 +0000 http://milwaukeerecord.com/?p=53987 Summer in Milwaukee is the best; summer in the Midwest is even better. Join Milwaukee Record and Miller High Life as we search the city and beyond for the Spirit Of Summer. Known to many as the “City Of Festivals,” Milwaukee could just as easily be called “City Of Museums.” Tourists and locals alike flock […]

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Summer in Milwaukee is the best; summer in the Midwest is even better. Join Milwaukee Record and Miller High Life as we search the city and beyond for the Spirit Of Summer.

Known to many as the “City Of Festivals,” Milwaukee could just as easily be called “City Of Museums.” Tourists and locals alike flock to the nationally-renowned Milwaukee Art Museum to check out the destination’s impressive and ever-changing collection. Similarly, Milwaukee Public Museum has entertained and informed downtown visitors with its eclectic exhibits and The Streets Of Old Milwaukee for generations. The Harley-Davidson Museum has given riders and other bike enthusiasts a lesson on one of Milwaukee’s best-known products in its gorgeous facility for that last 10 years. America’s Black Holocaust Museum will soon shed new light on important social issues that are still being felt in the country today when it re-opens in the Bronzeville neighborhood.

While the city boasts those top-tier museums, Milwaukee and its surrounding cities also offers a vast array of collections that celebrate and document a wide range of topics and a variety of different cultures. From a Bobblehead Hall Of Fame in the Third Ward and a beer museum (with a fully-operational bar) in The Shops Of Grand Avenue to a railroad club in New Berlin and an informative way to kill time at General Mitchell International Airport, here are 15 lesser-known museums located in or around Milwaukee.

1. Brew City MKE
While we never got the opportunity to say goodbye to the Applebee’s in The Shops Of Grand Avenue, its spirit now lives on with Brew City MKE. Last year, Milwaukee County Historical Society took over the space in the mall where people once ate good in the neighborhood, and they’ve since made the space into a full-fledged beer museum. Brew City MKE features vintage brewery ads and photography, old bottles and other artifacts and—best yet—a beer bar that’s stocked with an impressive selection of local beer. Tours are $10 ($7 for visitors 13-20 and free for children) and include a beer or soda. If you’re not feeling a tour and just want a drink in the mall, there’s no cost to skip the museum and just enter the bar.

2. Chudnow Museum Of Yesteryear
Just west of downtown and the interstate sits a strange, nondescript portal to another time. Formerly used as the office of Milwaukee lawyer and antique collector Avrum Chudnow, the understated 11th Street property eventually became a place for the Americana enthusiast to store some of his acquisitions. In 2012, seven years after his death, the public was invited to look at Avrum’s things at what was dubbed Chudnow Museum Of Yesteryear. The varied collection is organized into a series of period-themed settings. There’s a drug store, a grocery store, a “Wonderland Park” malt shop (with old time sodas for sale), a hardware store, a train depot, a doctor’s office, a small movie house that screens historical shorts and old cartoons on a loop, and even a secret speakeasy (if you can find it). Admission is $6 ($5 for kids 7-13, free for kids 6 or younger) and there’s no place quite like it.

3. Grohmann Museum
Pay attention when you’re walking through the MSOE campus and you’re bound to find the Grohmann Museum, which considers itself to be “the world’s most comprehensive art collection dedicated to the evolution of human work.” We’re not so sure about all that, but we can tell you the engineer school’s ultra-specific gallery features more than 1,300 paintings and sculptures that show men and women working, toiling, crafting, and creating. In addition to the “Man At Work” collection donated by Dr. Eckhart Grohmann (the downtown museum’s namesake), the overlooked art gallery has digital exhibitions, rotating special exhibits, family events, and a rooftop sculpture garden. General admission is $5 ($3 for students, free for kids).

4. Jewish Museum Milwaukee
In a space overlooking the lake on Milwaukee’s Lower East Side, Jewish Museum Milwaukee allows visitors the opportunity examine the history of Milwaukee’s Jewish community, and to see how that history compares to the life and experience of Jewish people throughout the country and world in the past. Permanent exhibitions include themes like immigration, Jewish belief and community, intolerance and the holocaust, Israel and after, and contributions to Milwaukee and the world. The special exhibit at the moment is Stitching Histories From The Holocaust. Adding to the exhibitions are occasional events and educational opportunities. Jewish Museum Milwaukee grants a localized look at a worldwide tragedy and the unbreakable spirit of those most affected by it. The museum is open every day except Saturday. Admission is $7 (with discounts for students and seniors, free for active duty military and children under 6).

5. Lionel Railroad Club
Founded in 1947, the New Berlin-based Lionel Railroad Club is said to be one of the oldest groups of its kind left in Wisconsin. So what is it exactly? According to the description on the club and museum’s website:

“An educational, non-profit, charitable, and benevolent organization of individuals participating in the spirit of good fellowship by preserving our nation’s railroad heritage through maintaining, operating, and demonstrating toy trains in the joy of model railroading and providing educational opportunities concerning railroading, its influence on history, and our nation’s past, current, and future development.”

We couldn’t have said it better ourselves. Well, maybe we could have, but we won’t try. If you’re a train hobbyist or you just want to hop aboard for an afternoon of model trains in the suburbs, the club and museum is open to the public from 1-10 p.m. every Friday, with select few hours on Saturdays and Sundays between October and April. Tours are free.

6. Milwaukee Fire Historical Society & Fire Museum
Dedicated to preserving Milwaukee’s fire history, Milwaukee Fire Historical Society & Fire Museum is presently located on the 1600 block of Oklahoma Avenue in the former firehouse of Engine Company 23 and Truck Company 14. Through the museum, the society aims to keep the traditions, history, and heritage of the MFD alive in the former firehouse (which was designated a historical landmark in 2001). There, visitors can check out memorabilia and vintage firefighting equipment, while also learning proper practices during a blaze. Exhibits include a working 1910 fire alarm telegraph, a 1920s-era firehouse kitchen, and other furniture and fixtures that fit the roaring ’20s theme. Hours are limited to the first Sunday of every month from 1-3 p.m. Admission is free, but donations are accepted.

7. Mitchell Gallery Of Flight
We don’t blame you if you’ve been too concerned with catching your flight or preparing for takeoff with a drink at Chili’s Too to notice there’s actually a museum in General Mitchell International Airport. It’s true! The Mitchell Gallery Of Flight grants passengers-to-be learning opportunity during their layover with a history lesson about the airport’s namesake (decorated military hero/Milwaukeean General Billy Mitchell) and Captain Lance P. Sijan, along with vintage airport photography and adverts, model airplanes, and other aviation artifacts. Admission to the non-profit museum is free, but donations are appreciated. If you have some time to kill before your next flight, we recommend checking it out.

8. National Bobblehead Hall Of Fame And Museum
Okay, so this one is actually a glimpse into a lesser-known Milwaukee museum to come. After experiencing some success with crowdfunding, the National Bobblehead Hall Of Fame And Museum appears poised to wiggle and wobble its way into a permanent home on 1st Street (above Stack’d Burger Bar) in the near future. We can’t tell you exactly when this will happen, but we’re sure you can expect thousands upon thousands of bobbleheads to line the shelves. Will this Pat McCurdy promotional giveaway find its way into the collection? Only time will tell.

9. North Point Lighthouse
Sometimes when something is right in front of you all the time (or right above you, in this case), you forget its significance. Beyond being a Milwaukee landmark and a literal beacon on the city’s East Side since the late 1800s, North Point Lighthouse is also a functional museum. You can tour the 130-year-old museum, browse artifacts, learn about the lighthouse’s past keepers, and look back at Milwaukee’s place in maritime happenings on Lake Michigan. North Point Lighthouse Museum is open Saturday and Sunday from 1-4 p.m. and seasonally from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays.

10. The Selig Experience
Back in 2016, the Milwaukee Brewers took an unused portion of the left field loge and turned it into The Selig Experience. The 1,400-square-foot exhibit is an “interactive fan experience” that includes a 10-12 minute video highlighting former Brewers owner, ex-MLB commissioner, and Milwaukee native Allan H. “Bud” Selig’s “unforgettable journey” from a baseball-obsessed boy to a baseball-saving commissioner. (Seriously: dude saved baseball in Milwaukee and deserves every honor coming his way, 2002 All-Star Game be damned.) A replica of Selig’s County Stadium office from his days as Brewers president was installed, complete with “historical artifacts” like stacks of paper, pencils, and chairs. But perhaps most enticing/insane part of this game distraction is a 3-D Bud Selig hologram. We repeat, a 3-D Bud Selig hologram. Admission is free (with game ticket).

11. Thomas A. Green Geological Museum
Back in the late 1800s, amateur Milwaukee geologist Thomas A. Green was said to have amassed a collection of rocks, minerals, and fossils that was the largest this side of Philadelphia. When he died, his heirs donated that “irreplaceable” collection—totaling approximately 75,000 specimens—to Milwaukee-Downer College (which became part of UW-Milwaukee’s campus). The collection (or what’s now called Thomas A. Green Geological Museum) has been moved to another location on campus and is now in the possession of the school’s Department Of Geosciences. However, Green’s collection—highlighted by fossils from quarries that no longer exist and a piece of meteorite that landed in Washington County—remains at the school and can be viewed by the public. Hours are limited in summer, but you can visit much more often once the fall semester starts.

12. Villa Terrace Decorative Arts Museum
Just down the road from Milwaukee Art Museum sits another stunning art museum with a wholly different focus. Villa Terrance Decorative Arts Museum (along with nearby and affiliated Charles Allis Art Museum) helps extend the visual arts reputation of Milwaukee’s Lower East Side. Villa—named for the gorgeous century-old Italian-style mansion that houses the collection—has a wide variety of fine and decorative art that dates as far back as the 15th century. There’s also wrought iron work, continually changing special exhibitions, and even the occasional local concert in the sprawling and altogether beautiful space. Admission is $7 ($5 for students and seniors, free for children) and free to all who visit the first Wednesday of each month.

13. West Allis Historical Society
Long before West Allis was a place to get 50-cent beers and the inspiration for a particularly mean-spirited video (which, again, we had NOTHING TO DO WITH), the western Milwaukee suburb was a place with booming industry and oodles of history. Both are on display at the West Allis Historical Society, a museum that’s committed to preserving the rich and inimitable past of the misunderstood locale. Admission and parking are both free. The museum itself is only open from 2-4 p.m. on Sundays and 7-9 p.m. Tuesdays, but the grounds are also home to Honey Creek Park, Honey Creek Log Schoolhouse Museum, and Honey Creek Cemetery.

14. Wisconsin Black Historical Society And Museum
Located on the corner of 27th and Center streets, Wisconsin Black Historical Society And Museum has been committed to preserving African American history in Wisconsin for 30-plus years. Visitors can get a locally-relevant lesson on “the African American labor experience in Wisconsin” through the museum’s “Work’n In The Promise Land” exhibit, and get to know more about both local and national civil rights pioneers in the “NAACP Civil Rights Tribute Bus Exhibit.” Check out the outstanding new “Ancient Egypt To Modern Milwaukee” mural or spread the knowledge beyond the museum’s walls with documents you can pick up at the museum’s Learning Center. Wisconsin Black Historical Society And Museum is open every day except Sunday. Admission is $5.

15. Wisconsin Museum Of Quilts And Fiber Arts
Last and absolutely least, we come to Wisconsin Museum Of Quilts And Fiber Arts out in semi-nearby Cedarburg. The museum strives to “create, preserve, and educate” and highlight the importance and intricacies behind this endangered art form. If quilting doesn’t move the needle for you, you’ve reached the end of this post. If you’re crazy about quilting or you know someone who is, take a trek out to Cedarburg. Hit up a winery or an artisan cheese shop. Hell, why not make a day of it! Admission is $8 for adults or $7 for seniors 65 and older. So yeah, admission is basically $7 in most cases.

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